Wests Tigers Mascot, Timmy the Tiger, has sensationally called it quits, saying he can no longer be an enabler for rugby league’s “addiction to self destruction.”

In a break-up letter to his “friend and foe” published on Facebook last Friday, the man in the striped, furry suit explained why he finally had to say goodbye to the code.

Timmy described how, following a deep bout of introspection over a cup of tea, he felt he could no longer promote a game with such wayward morals.

“No longer can I look young kids in the eyes and deliver your promise. No longer can I encourage the public to give their heart and soul to me, and you,” Timmy lamented.

While he stopped short of blaming the Mitchell Pearce dog-sex-simulation scandal, insiders believe the incident was the tipping point behind the beloved mascot’s decision to abandon the game.

“It seems to be a case of one act of faux-bestiality too much,” one source told TPA.

Forever running in our hearts

Forever running in our hearts

Timmy’s decision to retire marks the end of a stellar, if not short, career that will be fondly remembered by the Leichhardt faithful.

After taking on the mascot role in March 2015, Timmy immediately displayed natural flair, winning the affections of Tigers fans with a mix of passion, energy and verve.

He later worked his way into hearts of NRL fans around the country when he appeared in the viral, short film Mascot Madness that charted the depths of his enthusiasm for the game, and for his cherished Wests Tigers.

In the film, Timmy expressed his avid commitment to both club and code, and spoke about his hopes and dreams for his role as the Tigers chief hype-man.

“I really want to take this global. I have a ten year vision here. My grand vision is to have a mascot race at half-time at Origin, which I think could be better than meatloaf, put it that way,” he said at the time.

While Timmy’s dream of a mascot race did happen (at last year’s NRL Grand Final, which saw him win in controversial circumstances), it appears his ten-year, global plans have ended prematurely. And with that, the NRL has lost another fan, and a special one at that.

By Ben Shine